Sorrowsworn Tactics

In the Feywild, creatures spring into existence that are the manifestations of the feelings of mortals. In the Shadowfell, this happens, too, but only for the really bad feelings. These creatures are the sorrowsworn.

The intriguing thing about the sorrowsworn is that they literally feed off negative emotions. Doing violence to the Angry, for instance, makes its attacks more effective, while refusing to do violence to it reduces its effectiveness.

All sorrowsworn have 60 feet of darkvision—good for the gloom of the Shadowfell—and are resistant to physical damage from any type of weapon, not just nonmagical weapons, while out of bright light. (more…)

Phase Spider Tactics

I’m puzzled as to why certain creatures are included in the “Miscellaneous” Appendix A of the fifth-edition Monster Manual, which consists mostly—but not entirely—of regular animals, such as apes, bears, crocodiles and so forth. Why, alongside this menagerie of mundane beasts and their oversize cousins, do we also find awakened trees and shrubs, blink dogs, death dogs, wargs (excuse me, “worgs”) and phase spiders? Why didn’t these monsters (none of them is categorized as a “beast”) rate their own listings in the body of the book? So odd.

Phase spiders differ from giant spiders in a variety of minor respects and two significant ones. First, while they have the Web Walker feature, they don’t spin webs. This struck me as so peculiar that I checked the MM errata to confirm that it wasn’t a mistake. Second, they have the Ethereal Jaunt feature, which lets them phase back and forth between the material plane and the ethereal plane.

I’m going to take a quick look at its other traits and then come back to these, because I think the phase spider is in need of some flavor text that explains what it’s all about. (more…)

Banderhobb Tactics

My apologies, readers: Between putting out the second edition of Live to Tell the Tale, going car-buying, and then coming down with some not-the-flu-yet-still-distinctly-flu-like bug, I haven’t had a very productive March, blog-wise. But let’s see what I can still jam out under the wire.

I’ve got quite a few reader requests queued up, and the one that’s been in the queue the longest is the banderhobb, yet another monster that supports Sam Sykes’ dictum, “Frogs are seriously bad news, man.” The banderhobb’s froglike appearance is a little misleading, since it’s not amphibious, nor can it leap, although it can attack targets with its tongue. Instead, it’s a deadly combination of powerful brute and relentless hunter, which stalks its prey in the dark.

And don’t let the term “brute” fool you: even though it possesses extraordinary Strength and Constitution, it doesn’t lack Intelligence and in fact has a fairly high Wisdom, high enough for it to choose its battles and its moments. It’s also expert in Stealth, and it has 120 feet of darkvision. These traits, plus its Shadow Stealth and Shadow Step features, indicate that it strikes from hiding rather than charging brazenly into battle.

According to the lore in Volo’s Guide to Monsters, a banderhobb is the creation of a malicious mage or fey creature, called to serve as a thief, kidnapper or assassin. It doesn’t live very long and so, despite its high Wisdom, has no survival instinct to speak of; it exists only to fulfill its orders. If a group of player characters encounters one, it will be on the hunt, its quarry either a non-player character or one of the PCs themselves. (In rare instances, it may be hunting an object rather than a person.) (more…)

Yeti Tactics

Scourges of the arctic peaks, yetis are reclusive apex predators renowned for their bloodlust. Being impervious to the cold and having a keen sense of smell, they may be encountered wandering the foggy terrain around a white dragon lair or venturing out to hunt in a swirling blizzard.

With exceptional Strength and Constitution and merely above-average Dexterity, yetis are brute melee fighters, but they do have a couple of features they gain an edge from. One is their proficiency in Stealth, which combined with their Keen Smell and Snow Camouflage features gives them tremendous incentive to ambush prey in low-visibility conditions, such as the darkness of night or the whiteout of a snowstorm. The other is Chilling Gaze, which is part of its Multiattack.

Chilling Gaze requires the yeti to be within 30 feet of its target, so it has to exercise patience, staying hidden until its prey is close enough for it to strike—but that doesn’t mean it leaves this to chance. Yetis have Wisdom 12, high enough for them to exercise care in choosing their targets, and like other predators hunting for a meal, they favor the young, the old, the weak, the isolated and the oblivious. They’ll actively maneuver to bring themselves within strike range of such a target, counting on the combination of their Stealth proficiency, their Snow Camouflage and vision-obscuring conditions to keep themselves from being seen. (more…)

Displacer Beast Tactics

An old-school monster dating all the way back to the 1974 Greyhawk supplement, the displacer beast is a panther-like creature that walks on six legs but attacks with a pair of long, sinuous tentacles emerging from its shoulders. Its name comes from its power to make itself appear to be several feet from where it actually is.

Aside from this passive feature, there’s not much in the displacer beast’s stat block to make it anything but a straightforward brute. Its primary physical abilities are Strength and Constitution, its 40-foot movement speed makes charging a snap, and it has no feature that allows or encourages a unique method of attack.

So to find a displacer beast fighting style that differs at all from that of other “Rrrrahhhh, bash bash bash” brutes, we have to look to three things: its armor class, its reach and the Monster Manual flavor text. (more…)